What’s in a Name?

What’s in a Name?

What’s in a name? Names are powerful way that we humans distill the lives and identities of people into a linguistic expression. Names are powerful. We are lucky because our Lord became human, and even the evocation of His name, Jesus, holds power (think about the Jesus Prayer). In the Jewish tradition, the name for Lord is YHWH, an unpronounceable and incomprehensible name for God. In Christianity, we know our God and His name.

My name, Demetri (or legally, Demetrios), comes from my grandfather, and our patron saint is St. Demetrios of Thessaloniki. He guides his namesakes, and the city of Thessaloniki of which he was charged to protect during his earthly life as a Roman. Patron saints are important because they are our guides and hopes to follow in their holy lives. Today (10/26), marks the feast day for St. Demetrios, so many years to all those celebrating!

Here is some information about his life, borrowed from a writing by the Greek Orthodox Archdiocese daily readings:

“Saint Demetrius was a Thessalonian, a most pious son of pious and noble parents, and a teacher of the Faith of Christ. When Maximian first came to Thessalonica in 290, he raised the Saint to the rank of Duke of Thessaly. But when it was discovered that the Saint was a Christian, he was arrested and kept bound in a bath-house. While the games were under way in the city, Maximian was a spectator there. A certain friend of his, a barbarian who was a notable wrestler, Lyaeus by name, waxing haughty because of the height and strength of his body, boasted in the stadium and challenged the citizens to a contest with him. All that fought with him were defeated. Seeing this, a certain youth named Nestor, aquaintance of Demetrius’, came to the Saint in the bath-house and asked his blessing to fight Lyaeus single-handed. Receiving this blessing and sealing himself with the sign of the precious Cross, he presented himself in the stadium, and said, “O God of Demetrius, help me!” and straightway he engaged Lyaeus in combat and smote him with a mortal blow to the heart, leaving the former boaster lifeless upon the earth. Maximian was sorely grieved over this, and when he learned who was the cause of this defeat, he commanded straightway and Demetrius was pierced with lances while he was yet in the bath-house, As for Nestor, Maximian commanded that he be slain with his own sword.”

St. Demetrios was a young adult during the time of his martyrdom. He stayed true to his faith, despite the danger that it entailed. He was a high-ranking officer in the Roman military and was a very successful and educated man. He humbly accepted his legal punishment but offered his boldness and devotion in prayer to God on behalf of his friend, Nestor. St. Demetrios provided answers and prayer in times of fear and anxiety. His relics still stream myrrh to this day and are located in Thessaloniki.

For me, St. Demetrios is a guide and an example for me to follow in his footsteps. Just as parents genetically pass down traits and qualities, so do spiritual namesakes. I mean, many of our parents name us after specific people and saints, and we name them after them in hopes that they emulate the life of that saint, and that the saint guards them in life. My name is a way for me to honor my grandfather, and continue his memory. St. Demetrios is the patron saint of the organization that arose from the repatriation of the people of my village to the United States. When I think of St. Demetrios I also can understand my personal history and the guidance he gave to the people coming from my father’s village. I particularly turn to my saint when I feel stressed about my direction in life. Knowing that we share a name, my connection with him is a lot deeper.

A relationship with the saints is important as an Orthodox Christian. They are our examples, guides and protectors throughout our lives. Luckily, their stories come to us and you can accumulate different relationships throughout different times in your life. For example, St. Joseph becomes an awfully important saint as soon as a man becomes a father. They are the living example of gospels and they want to love and support us. Building a relationship with them now is important because they stand a lot closer to God as of now than we do, ask them to pray for you. And if you don’t have a good particular relationship with a saint, the best place to start is with the Theotokos. She is our church’s greatest saint and she also has a motherly relationship with our lord. Another good place to start is with your patron saint, whether it be the saint you were named after, or the saint of your family (in terms of slava). Reach out to them!

St. Demetrios was charged with protecting Thessaloniki during his earthly life as a roman general. As he was stripped of his authority and job, his true path in the spiritual protection of the city was revealed.

St. Demetrios is a powerful saint, and I am grateful for his spiritual guidance in my life. I hope that we all can embody is courage, faith and strength in our own lives. St. Demetrios was known to intercede in an earthquake in Thessaloniki, when your life may seem like its falling apart, ask for his help. Or, if there is a real natural disaster, ask for his help. May he intercede for us all!

There’s No I in Prayer

There’s No I in Prayer

Growing up participating in extracurricular activities, you learn a lot of life lessons that stick with you forever. One of the biggest lessons everyone learns at a young age is about the importance of teamwork.

Everyone knows the go to phrase that every coach or teacher would say constantly: “There is no ‘I’ in ‘Team.’” Whether you played sports, an instrument, performed in plays, or anything else, you were taught early on that teamwork makes the dream work. You learned that teamwork was one of the biggest keys in being successful.

Just like being a team player is essential to being successful in activities or careers, being a team player is also essential to growing our relationship with Christ and the Church. So how can we become team players in the Orthodox Church? Go to Church on a regular basis.

Why does going to Church make you a team player?

You are present with people who share your faith and you are worshiping together, as a family, as a team, leading each other into the Kingdom of Heaven.

The word “Church” comes from the Greek word ekklesia which in ancient Athens signified the citizens assembly. The Church is not meant to just be a place for individuals, it was created and designed to be a place for a multitudes of people to assemble and be immersed in their common faith. Think about the Divine Liturgy. The Divine Liturgy is full of prayers that specifically focus on a group of people. After each petition, are the words “…let US pray to the Lord.” Not let ME pray to the Lord, but let US pray to the Lord. These prayers are meant for all of us, together as God’s faithful servants to come together and pray to the Lord.

In Matthew 18:20, Christ says “Where two or three are gathered together in my name, there I am in the midst of them.” How cool is it to think about that? Christ said it to us Himself. He is in our midst when we all come together to pray in His name.

Coming together and praying as a team helps us to build a stronger connection not just to Christ, but to each other. When we worship Christ with others, we feel that we are part of the same team. We feel that we are struggling and getting through life together. The more people with whom we are praying, the stronger our prayers become, bringing us all closer to Christ and to each other.

So why can’t you pray on your own? You can, and you definitely should. Just like a professional athlete takes care of himself outside of practices and games, we should be taking care of our spiritual life when we are not present in the Church. But just like the professional athlete, it is required of us as Orthodox Christians to come together, as a team, and support each other in growing in our spiritual lives.

No one can struggle through life alone. We need our spiritual team to support us with our struggles in life. We need to be present at Church for our prayers to be united with the prayers of our teammates. We need to be present at Church and allow Christ to be in our midst.

So let’s work together to become closer to each other and Christ. Let’s gather in His Church and worship together as one team. Together we can pray with our team in order to live our dream in the Kingdom of God. 


Hi everyone! My name is Joanna Psyhogios. I am from Wilmette, Illinois and I am a member at St. John the Baptist Church in Des Plaines Illinois. My first experience with OCF was during College Conference East, and I have been active in participating in College Conference and OCF Retreats ever since. In my free time, I love to play and watch every sport, coach basketball to youth teams, watch movies and TV Shows, and play Jungle Speed (Shoutout to CC Midwest!). I am really excited to share what I have learned about the Orthodox faith through the OCF blogs!

Impactful Lines | The Akathist of Thanksgiving

Impactful Lines | The Akathist of Thanksgiving

The OCF theme of the 2017-2018 school year is “Glory to God for All Things.” This phrase comes from the Akathist of Thanksgiving. Filled with many petitions covering the innumerable things for which we give thanks to God, we asked each SLB member to select their favorite we share the favorite line from the Akathist. Below are their answers.

“Glory to Thee, showing me the beauty of the universe.” – Val

“Blessed are they that will share in the King’s Banquet: but already on earth Thou givest me a foretaste of this blessedness. How many times with Thine own hand hast Thou held out to me Thy Body and Thy Blood, and I, though a miserable sinner, have received this Mystery, and have tasted Thy love, so ineffable, so heavenly.” – Tasya

“Glory to Thee, welcoming the impulse of our heart’s love.” – Caroline

“Glory to Thee for every happening. Every condition Thy providence has put me in.” – Quinn

“Outside is the darkness of the whirlwind, the terror and howling of the storm, but in the heart, in the presence of Christ, there is light and peace, silence: Alleluia!” – Spyri

“Glory to Thee, for what Thou hast hidden from us in Thy Wisdom.” – Anna

“Glory to Thee, making us dissatisfied with earthly things.” – Michael

“Glory to Thee for the joy of living, moving and being able to return Thy love.” – David

“Glory to Thee for calling me into being.” – Amelia

“Glory to Thee, sending us failure and misfortune that we may understand the sorrows of others.” – Nora

“Glory to Thee for the unforgettable moments of life.” – Fev

“Glory to Thee at the hushed hour of nightfall” – Peter

“Glory to Thee for every step of my life’s journey.” – Rachel

“Glory to Thee for the love of parents, for the faithfulness of friends.” – Markayla

“Glory to Thee for Thy mercies, seen and unseen.” – Mark Saber

“Glory to Thee, making Thyself known where man shows mercy on his neighbour.” – Ben

“Glory to Thee, making wonderfully Sweet the keeping of Thy commandments.” – Mark Sultani

“Glory to thee for the depths of thy wisdom, the whole world a living sign of it.” – Nicole

Glory to God for All Things | Weathering the Storm

Glory to God for All Things | Weathering the Storm

This month, our Blog Contributors were asked to submit reflections on the Akathist of Thanksgiving, from which comes OCF’s 2018 theme, #GloryToGod. To kick off our series, here’s Mark Ghannam.

Winter is coming. As the winter days approach those of us who live in places where the weather takes a cold turn, perhaps the award for the timeliest spiritual metaphor should be given to the whirlwind, the terror and howling of the storm… which is taken from the Akathist service of the Eastern Orthodox Church. Let us use this metaphor to reflect on what the storm clouds are in our spiritual lives.

Through every season of our lives, the storm clouds of doubt, fear, jealousy, pride, and so on will always be around us. These storm clouds inhibit our ability to perceive, and delight in, the eternal light and hope of the Son.

Some of us may think we are impervious to the storms of life, or we mistakenly think that if we manipulate our external circumstances enough, we can completely defend ourselves against them. If I only had this material good, I would be happy. If I can just pull my grades up. If I can just land that internship.

This is simply not how it works.

For He makes his sun rise on the evil and on the good, and sends the rain on the righteous and the unrighteous (Matthew 5:45). Scripture tells us explicitly that the storms of life, spoken of in the Akathist, are an inevitable part of human existence.

What are we to do?

Unfortunately, umbrellas, Hunter rain boots, and Canada Goose jackets are not enough for these kinds of storms. We cannot hide, or pretend they do not exist, as many of us try to do. The Akathist has a much better answer.

The storm clouds of life bringeth no terror to those in whose hearts Thy fire is burning brightly. Outside is the darkness of the whirlwind, the terror and howling of the storm; but in the heart, in the presence of Christ, there is light, peace, and silence

 – Akathist of Thanksgiving, Kontakion 5

So many people will tell you that being a Christian is about being a good person, and that the Church exists so that it might spread good values. This is an understatement that is more egregious than saying in college, you might have to do some work outside of class once in a while.

Of course we are to be good people, and of course, as the Church, we must spread good values. However, there is a much higher calling to which we are called. The good news of Jesus Christ is about more than morality. It is about a total transformation, a radical repentance, that allows us to warm our hands by the fire of truth and beauty that lives inside of us.

We must dig deep within us to access, and live in, that place where our hearts our aflame with the love of Jesus Christ. The storm clouds can cover that place up, and make us believe it is not there. Fear and desire stand guard to keep us from paradise. If we can learn to set aside fear and desire through our spiritual practice, the gates of paradise will appear as they truly are: open.

In the external world, there is chaos. Deep within us is a place of silence and peace; a calm that is unmarred by the storms of life. We must go there. There is no other way.

St. Isaac the Syrian tells us that the highest form of prayer, is to stand silently in awe before God. If we want to learn to brave the storms that will inevitably come, we must learn, and practice, finding the peace that resides deep inside of us.

Where to start?

Take a deep breath. Sit for a moment.

School keeps us busy. Emails, texts, social media, etc, are brilliant distractions that tear our minds away from our peace.

Start with five minutes. Take five minutes out of your day to set your phone aside (screen facing down), and sit silently. Make the sign of the cross, and just sit in silence and stillness. It is no mistake that the spiritual life is often called practice. Acquiring the spirit of peace, takes practice. We must practice being still, being silent, and waking up to the reality of the presence of God in our lives.

Were talking about practice!”–Allen Iverson

Life Rants & Girls’ Night | Spiritual Companionship

Life Rants & Girls’ Night | Spiritual Companionship

Among my group of girlfriends, the subject of spiritual fathers has come up a lot lately–how to build a relationship with a priest enough to be able to confide in them, confession with priests, reaching out, etc. It’s been a topic of conversation and anxiety for a while, especially as we get increasingly busier with our lives and search for spiritual guidance.

Flashback about three weeks ago. I was talking to a close friend of mine among the said group. I called her to catch up but I admittedly had an ulterior motive. I was having a life-transition crisis and I needed to vent it out. I knew she would offer the perfect guidance as a friend, fellow Christian, and a critic to tell me I needed to chill out–which I very much needed. My rant to her was a flurry of stress and worry over every little decision I had made in the past month. Whether I made the right school choice, career aspirations, why the heck I left Texas (best country out there), etc. etc. (there were a lot of et ceteras). It was a life update turned into a storm of stress and worry and anxiety over every little thing. As I was venting through all this, I did begrudgingly acknowledge that I was worrying about it way more than I was praying about it. I had been so caught up in analyzing of all of it that I just could not get out of my head enough to take a step back and turn to God. Come to think of it, as worried as I was, I did have to admit that I had gotten some cool opportunities since starting school and even got a job opportunity that I would have never gotten if I hadn’t moved. In fact, there were a lot of moments over the past month that were little blessings to keep me going, even though I hadn’t thought to focus on them.

As I was talking this out (I’m very much a talk-it-out person, down to calling my sister at the grocery store about whether to get Ben & Jerry’s or Talenti), my friend laughed.

“You know I had a wise friend once tell me that when things get overwhelming, you just need to step back and P.R.A.Y. And you literally just did that, but backwards.”

The P.R.A.Y. acronym stands for Praise, Repent, Ask for others, and then for Yourself. What’s ironic is that I was the one who had told her about that method (can’t take all the credit; shout out to Gigi Shadid, 2012 CSR Winter Camp speaker). And she was right–I basically used the P.R.A.Y. method but backwards, choosing to count my blessings last instead of first. It was a funny full-circle moment as I sheepishly consented to my backwardness of thought.

Fast forward to a week or two later during our girls’ night discussion. Our topic was spiritual fathers since it had been on all of our minds (this is what we read if you want to know). Throughout the course of our conversation, we came to the realization that, in a way, we were all each other’s spiritual advisors. Don’t get me wrong–friends do not by any means replace a clergy advisor. But we realized that there are a lot more people surrounding us who are leading us on the Path than we really saw because we were so focused on the idea of a “spiritual father” alone, not realizing the countless ways we were advising and guiding each other spiritually.

So here’s my take-away for you. Lean on each other for spiritual guidance and companionship, friends. The people you surround yourself with, whether through OCF or other means, will have more of an impact on you than you realize, and taking this life journey with them makes it so much more comforting and doable. After all, it is said that you come to emulate the five people you spend the most time with. Think of who those five people are and whether you would be proud to reflect them. For me the answer is thankfully a resounding yes.


Hibbah Kaileh is a graduate student at George Washington University studying global security policy. She served as the South Student Leader on the 2015-2016 Student Leadership Board. Among her many talents is the ability to voraciously devour a novel (usually Harry Potter) or a Netflix series (usually The Office) in the span of a few days.